15 Reasons Why I Love Being Catholic

342px-Francisco_de_Zurbarán_-_Christ_on_the_Cross_-_WGA26051God, the Father: Creator of Heaven and Earth.  Father Almighty.  God of Love.  One of three Persons in the Trinity.  Through Him, all things were made.

Jesus: The Son of the Living God, Begotten not made, one if being with the Father.  Agreeing submitting His Will to the Father, Jesus suffered an horrific death for the sake of all humankind.  “Not my Will,” He said, “But Your Will be done.”

Holy Spirit:  The Third Person of the Trinity.  The Comforter.  The Guide.  The Paraclete

The Resurrection of the Body:  Jesus defeated death when He rose from the dead.  By His death we were saved.  By His Resurrection, we, too, will rise, one day.

The Truth - The Catholic Church speaks the truth, even if it’s not a popular truth to speak.  From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: Article 1: Section 1950: The Moral Law.

“The moral law is the work of divine Wisdom. Its biblical meaning can be defined as fatherly instruction, God’s pedagogy. It prescribes for man the ways, the rules of conduct that lead to the promised beatitude; it proscribes the ways of evil which turn him away from God and his love. It is at once firm in its precepts and, in its promises, worthy of love.”

Read More at:: His Unending Love

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God Speaks: Are You Listening?

God Speaks

When God speaks do you really listen? Read more to learn about my struggles with listening for God’s voice and guidance in this noisy and stimulating world.

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Virginia Lieto

You can find Virginia blogging about the virtues at virginialieto.com. Virginia speaks on a variety of Catholic topics, especially the virtues! She is also an adjunct professor at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine – Theology Program Online. Her first upcoming book titled, Adventures of Faith, Hope and Charity – Finding Patience will hopefully be published during 2015 – God willing! She lives in Harrisburg, NC with her husband of 35+ years, Nick.

Eve’s Apple: Virtual Book Tour and Giveaway

Eve’s Apple by Marie Therese Kceif.Eve's Apple book cover

Short Synopsis
A Witness of God’s Faithfulness: Marie struggles to grow in grace and guidance from the Lord while slowly recognizing her own rebellion. She intimately shows us the highs of her aviation, military and automotive careers and the suffering lows of abuse, bankruptcy, and divorce. Her relationship with God grows through it all. Eve’s Apple is a witness of how God gently guides one of His Eves into a slow freeing surrender of a Mary’s trusting yes. This is a journey of hope, faith, and real relationship!

Available on Amazon in softcover and hardback:

Also available at the Publisher’s Website:

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Melanie Jean Juneau is a wife, writer and mother of nine children who blogs at joy of nine9. The very existence of a joyful mother of nine children seems to confound people. Part of her call and her witness is to write the truth about children, family, marriage and the sacredness of life, especially a life lived in God.

Fearing God

Isaiah Theophany

For about 1800 years most Christians would have understood the idea of fearing the Lord to mean just what it said on the tin. Over the past couple of centuries or so the tendency has been for many theologians, pastors and teachers to explain away the notion of fear and replace it with something altogether more cuddly. Two main strategies have been employed, to emphasise that perfect love casts out fear and to re-cast the word ‘fear’ to mean ‘awe.’ Both approaches are perfectly sound so far as they go but effectively unbalance doctrine by being deployed as primary explanations rather than as auxiliaries to add to our understanding of the plain meaning of Scripture.

The first argument rests on the words of the Beloved Disciple There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear; for fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not reached perfection in love.(1 John 4:18) It is worth noting the contrast between beginning andreached perfection. If every mention of fear is immediately counterbalanced with the effects of perfect love it will have the same effect as telling a child on the first day of primary school not to worry because whatever they do they will get a university degree in due course since perfect education means prizes for all. Perfect love is not our starting point fear of the Lord is, click here to read more 

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I am 50something, born in Scotland, living in England. By profession I am a registered nurse but due to long term illness have not worked for a couple of years.

Need Motivation to Exercise Self-Control?

Put God First

Need motivation to exercise self-control? Perhaps you have tried to quit smoking, drinking, or taking drugs. Perhaps you have tried to lose weight, or not work so many long hours, only to be drawn back in to the temptation. You tell yourself that you can have all the motivation you could want and somehow, you still succumb to the temptation. Great starts, lousy finishes! You try again, only to see the cycle repeat itself.

I’ve been on that hamster wheel with my weight! So, I speak from experience. It wasn’t until this last time of weight loss, when I got…Read more…

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Virginia Lieto

You can find Virginia blogging about the virtues at virginialieto.com. Virginia speaks on a variety of Catholic topics, especially the virtues! She is also an adjunct professor at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine – Theology Program Online. Her first upcoming book titled, Adventures of Faith, Hope and Charity – Finding Patience will hopefully be published during 2015 – God willing! She lives in Harrisburg, NC with her husband of 35+ years, Nick.

Joyful Chaos: Dining With Eleven

Listen as I struggled to gather my crew every night for a family meal.1511056_719664651430912_167545578033154281_n

“Oh good, you’re done barn chores. Perfect timing; dinner is almost ready.”

“Two more minutes, everybody!”

“Joseph I’ll help after we eat, okay?”

“Mary, please run up and open Jean’s door and shut off the music.”

‘Dinner is ready!”

“Grace, I know you love that book sweetheart but, remember, no reading at the dinner table.”

“Where’s Mark?”

“Honey would you lift up Daniel into the high chair?”

“Are we all here? Anyone missing?”

Ah, dinner time in a large family.

Dinner was the highlight of the day with everyone clamoring to share their news or simply squeeze in comments into the cacophony of voices. It was a humorous symphony which sounded perfectly in tune to my ears. High pitched baby squeals combined with loud, boisterous little boys.and the quavering of a male teen voice balanced teenage girl’s chatter. Dad’s reassuring bass tones soothed my shrill calls for everyone to listen to the toddler’s newest word. The highlight of this often unruly symphony was the spontaneous laughter punctuating the entire meal.

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It's easy to share your favorite Catholic Bloggers' posts!Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+

Melanie Jean Juneau is a wife, writer and mother of nine children who blogs at joy of nine9. The very existence of a joyful mother of nine children seems to confound people. Part of her call and her witness is to write the truth about children, family, marriage and the sacredness of life, especially a life lived in God.

Shakespeare & the Apostles

Agincourt, Imagination and the Bible

Agincourt

Then he took the twelve apostles aside, and warned them, Now we are going up to Jerusalem, and all that has been written by the prophets about the Son of Man is to be accomplished.  He will be given up to the Gentiles, and mocked, and beaten, and spat upon; they will scourge him, and then they will kill him; but on the third day he will rise again. They could make nothing of all this; his meaning was hidden from them, so that they could not understand what he said.
Luke 18:31-34

King of France
With pennons painted in the blood of Harfleur: 
Rush on his host, as doth the melted snow 
Upon the valleys, whose low vassal seat 
The Alps doth spit and void his rheum upon: 
Go down upon him, you have power enough, 
And in a captive chariot into Rouen 
Bring him our prisoner.
Constable of France.
 This becomes the great. 
Sorry am I his numbers are so few, 
His soldiers sick and famish’d in their march, 
For I am sure, when he shall see our army, 
He’ll drop his heart into the sink of fear 
And for achievement offer us his ransom
Henry V, Act III, Scene 5

The Apostles do not come well out of the Gospels. They seem to have a near perfect ability to misunderstand or not comprehend Jesus. It is tempting to dismiss them as unusually dense or at least woefully ignorant. It does not help much if we remember that we know the end of the story and they didn’t, that we have the benefit of the reflections on Jesus and His mission in the Epistles and two thousand years of Christian thought and they had to make do with very much less. The reason this is not helpful is because it is a purely intellectual exercise on our part. Most readers of the Gospels, Christian or not, are emotionally invested in Jesus, often to a great degree, and it hurts us when we see Him desperately trying and usually failing to make those closest to Him understand who He is and what He is doing. That emotional wound, that empathy which we feel, cannot really be touched simply by engaging in the mental exercise of adding up the things which the Apostles could have known and could have understood and comparing it with what our Lord was asking them to know and understand. Emotional wounds need to be treated with emotional medicines.

(enter Shakespeare)
One way of reading Scripture is to immerse oneself in it imaginatively. If we try to see the events unfolding before us not through the eyes and with the feelings of a 21st century person but as near as we can manage it with the feelings of the historical participants then our perspective will change. For most of us it will not be possible really to enter into the thought processes of the Apostles, the holy women or the Pharisees because their thinking was dominated by a framework of assumptions and experiences that only professional historians could really reproduce. Their feelings, however, would be akin to ones that we ourselves are familiar with because the lapse of two thousand years has effected no change in the human emotional range whatever it may have done to the world of ideas. In this context Act III, scene 5 of Henry V becomes a useful tool. Why? to read more click here

 

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I am 50something, born in Scotland, living in England. By profession I am a registered nurse but due to long term illness have not worked for a couple of years.

Devil Knocking: Anyone Home?

Devil Knocking 2

The devil knocks at our doors every day! Every time we are unable to resist temptation, we invite Satan to rule our lives. It’s that simple. For example, too much of anything creates an unhealthy imbalance, whether it is food, drink, sex, drugs, work, you name it. Worse, if we engage in immoral behavior, we not only open the door, but we set the table for the devil to take up housing and we push God away. So, what is the remedy? Embrace the virtue of self-control. Use your God-given intellect to make prudent choices. The first choice that you… Read more…

It's easy to share your favorite Catholic Bloggers' posts!Email this to someoneShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+
Virginia Lieto

You can find Virginia blogging about the virtues at virginialieto.com. Virginia speaks on a variety of Catholic topics, especially the virtues! She is also an adjunct professor at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine – Theology Program Online. Her first upcoming book titled, Adventures of Faith, Hope and Charity – Finding Patience will hopefully be published during 2015 – God willing! She lives in Harrisburg, NC with her husband of 35+ years, Nick.

Perpetual Sanctification (part 3)

 

Perpetual Sanctification (part 3)
Perpetual Sanctification (part 3)

I am still waiting for the Priest’s words to ring true.  I am waiting on the Grace of the Sacrament of Matrimony, as if it will somehow present itself and all will be well.  I think we are all like this, we want to see immediate results, feel the presence of the Holy Spirit, and be healed now! Continue reading

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Homily for the Second Sunday of Easter (Divine Mercy Sunday), April 12, 2015

Fr. René J. Butler, M.S.
Director, La Salette Shrine
Enfield, NH

Little did the disciples suspect how Thomas would react when they told him everything that had happened in his absence. Surely he would be thrilled to know that Jesus really was alive, and eager to hear all that Jesus had said and done when he appeared to them. How could they have expected him to refuse to believe them? It didn’t make sense.

It’s impossible to imagine that Thomas’s exchange with the other disciples was as brief as may appear from a single verse in the Gospel. After all, a whole week passed between the two scenes we have just read. And what a miserable week it must have been for Thomas, as the others kept trying to persuade him. There was probably plenty of frustration to go around on both sides. Read more

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